Motherland visit 2012 – segunda parte

After a great time at my brother’s wedding, our trip was turned into a road trip to Chile with my parents.
I had been looking forward to this for multiple reasons, one of them being that I hadn’t been to Chile myself in over a decade, and I wanted to see how things were looking nowadays. It was also going to be nice to go to the beach, sight-see and eating out. However, the by-far biggest reason that I was excited was to share an experience with Kelly that meant a lot to me: sharing a piece of my childhood.

My parents used to take my two brothers and I to Chile for vacations. We’d all 5 get in our car (a Renault sedan) and hit the road early in the morning so that we’d be settled into a rental near the water by sunset, where we’d make home for a week and go to the beach and have an overall kick-ass summer vacation.

Kelly got to see a preview of what this trip was like as far as scenery when we headed up to Uspallata, but that was only the tip of the proverbial iceberg. And since I hadn’t done the trip in a while either, I was almost as taken aback as her when we were deep into the Andes with its towering peaks, dramatic shadows and sharp turns in narrow roads.
After collecting a Chilean stamp on our passport, Kelly was introduced to the signature of the part of the way from Mendoza to Chile: 28 hairpin turns in a row to go down a very steep tall mountain. As a handicap, South-Americans like to throw old cargo trucks into the mix. The views are breathtaking, in both senses of the word.

Caracoles de Chile
Caracoles de Chile

We headed right into Santiago, Chile’s capital, where my cousin Laura lives. Her and her fiance put us up for the night, and we had a great time chatting and visiting their fancy and modern apartment.
On Monday, Laura and Nicolas had to go to work, so my parents and us were tourists in Santiago for the day. We walked around downtown, went to the seafood market and had a deliciously fresh lunch, took the subway to get across town, and “climbed” to the top of Santa Lucia Hill to get a panoramic view of the city. The view from the top is pretty cool, but Santiago is so damn smoggy that a better picture is that of the hill itself.

Cerro Santa Lucía
Cerro Santa Lucía

In the afternoon, we headed north towards Reñaca. I explained to Kelly that when I was a teenager most “cool” people from my landlocked motherland of Mendoza migrated here for the summer and it was hard to find a Chilean vacationing there. But this was the very end of summer, and it was not busy at all! We practically had the whole town to ourselves, which meant we didn’t have to wait to get into somewhere and it the only sound at night was that very soothing one of the waves crashing.

We woke up from our rental condo to a gorgeous view of the Pacific. Fresh ocean air meant we could see for miles, and far to the left (so, the South) we could spot our day-trip destination of Valparaiso.

View from condo in Reñaca
View from condo in Reñaca

In sharp contrast to the cosmopolitan modernity of Santiago, we marveled at Valparaiso’s super old buildings and its humble working-class denizens. There’s a maze of one-way narrow cobblestone streets, with even thinner sidewalks; there’s a slight smell of ocean, fish and salt… everywhere. There are people hustling you to hit up their lunch spot or to take boat tour around the area and maybe even fish something. But since we were only there for the day, we only had room to do one thing, so we did the best thing one could do in this world-heritage site: Get on a cable car/elevator and walk around the brightly-colored buildings that line the whole city.

Valparaiso street fish market
Valparaiso street fish market
Valparaiso landscape
Valparaiso landscape

Taking pictures in here was fun. There are great color combinations, very artful graffiti and it almost feels like being in a movie set.
Photographically speaking, I took one picture that I feel very lucky to have captured. To me, it conveys a lot about this particular experience: it’s busy and chaotic, bright but strikingly pretty, and results in a happy feeling after realizing you’ve spent a few seconds wondering the backstory to at least a couple of things depicted. I think one of these days I’ll make a print of it, that’s how much I like it:

Corner in Valparaiso
Corner in Valparaiso

 

We also visited Viña del Mar and Concón (where we got to eat at a place where Anthony Bourdain and his show went!), spent time on the beach and even dipped into the Southern Pacific’s waters, ate typical Chilean dishes and bought a souvenir or two.

The biggest thing I appreciate of these few days in Chile is to have spent it with my other half and my parents, all together and having fun. This quick getaway meant a lot to me because I got to revive and relive memories from my youth, and on top of that make new ones of these very happy days that I got to spend with the 3 people I love the most in the world, in a beautiful place.

On Reñaca beach with parents

One thought on “Motherland visit 2012 – segunda parte

  1. Con palabras justas, has descripto muy bien cómo te sentiste. Me deja feliz de haber compartido esos días juntos.

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